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Volume 142, Issue #7



Arts

POLYRHYTHMIC PULSE PALPITATES IN THEATRE

BY ELIZABETH SKOW

STAFF WRITER

Miguel Govea, one of several musicians who performed at the Dec. 2 World Music Showcase IV, solos on the trumpet. The concert was presented by City College's World Music Club.

NINA ROBINSON / GUARDSMAN

The Diego Rivera Theatre resonated with sound as musicians played music from China, Latin America and the United States to a packed house on Dec. 2.

The World Music Showcase Concert IV, presented by City College’s World Music Club, featured the Jasmine Flower Ensemble playing Chinese music on traditional instruments, Cascada de Flores playing Latin American music on guitars and traditional instruments, and Jeanie and Chuck’s Country Roundup playing bluegrass music on guitar, bass, banjo and fiddle.

Jeanie and Chuck’s County Roundup opened the festivities with a rousing set of traditional North American folk and bluegrass music.

Jeanie Poling’s clear, expressive voice stood out as she played guitar with husband Chuck picking mandolin, with fiddle, banjo and bass players expertly weaving between them.

Opening with a traditional tune, “Leather Britches,” they flew into a Carter Family song, “Gold Watch and Chain,” and from that to “Turn Your Radio On,” by Albert Brumley.

From there, they gave banjo player Dave Magram a chance to open it up on Earl Skruggs’ “Foggy Mountain Breakdown.”

They closed their five-song set with “Muleskinner Blues,” a knee-slapping number with Jeanie doing some yodeling.

The second ensemble featured three musicians playing mostly assorted string instruments — guitar, bass and traditional Latin American instruments.

“Cascada de Flores,” with guest Miguel Govea, featured Arwen Lawrence de Castellanos singing and playing guitar; she also played assorted traditional Latin American instruments, including the zapateado, a wooden box she danced on for percussion.

*** De Castellanos, accompanied by Govea on the trumpet, accordion, violin and guitarron — a traditional Latin American bass-type string instrument — and Jorge Liceaga playing guitar and the traditional string instruments guitarra de son and tres.

The trio had a huge and varied sound, playing songs from several different folkloric forms, such as Cancion Ranchera, or “song of the countryside,” which has its roots in the Mexican countryside, “Cancion Mexicana,” influenced by European and Cuban music and several other distinct Latin American styles.

The vocal blend between Lawrence de Castellanos and the two other musicians was outstanding, with the voices waxing and waning together skillfully.

Jasmine Flower Impression wrapped up the evening’s festivities with a varied set of traditional Chinese music, some of it arranged in modern style, all played on traditional Chinese instruments.

The first song, named after the ensemble, was an old folk song arranged by the composer, a member of the group.

Their next song was composed by Yuanlin Chen for the movie, “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon — a duet, a delicate dialogue between harp and hammered dulcimer, with occasional punctuation from traditional bowed instruments.

A gushing, or table harp, and a hammer dulcimer were played in every song, but two band members switched fluently between traditional reeds, strings and mouth-harp.

The sound made by this four-person group was stupendous. All four instruments sounded exotic, and the performance was splendid.

Presiding over the evening were the president and vice president of the World Music Club, Marlon Reynolds and Chi Fong Chan, who charmed the audience with silly jokes and prepared sketches.The Diego Rivera Theatre resonated with sound as musicians played music from China, Latin America and the United States to a packed house on Dec. 2.

The World Music Showcase Concert IV, presented by City College’s World Music Club, featured the Jasmine Flower Ensemble playing Chinese music on traditional instruments, Cascada de Flores playing Latin American music on guitars and traditional instruments, and Jeanie and Chuck’s Country Roundup playing bluegrass music on guitar, bass, banjo and fiddle.

Jeanie and Chuck’s County Roundup opened the festivities with a rousing set of traditional North American folk and bluegrass music.

Jeanie Poling’s clear, expressive voice stood out as she played guitar with husband Chuck picking mandolin, with fiddle, banjo and bass players expertly weaving between them.

Opening with a traditional tune, “Leather Britches,” they flew into a Carter Family song, “Gold Watch and Chain,” and from that to “Turn Your Radio On,” by Albert Brumley.

From there, they gave banjo player Dave Magram a chance to open it up on Earl Skruggs’ “Foggy Mountain Breakdown.”

They closed their five-song set with “Muleskinner Blues,” a knee-slapping number with Jeanie doing some yodeling.

The second ensemble featured three musicians playing mostly assorted string instruments — guitar, bass and traditional Latin American instruments.

“Cascada de Flores,” with guest Miguel Govea, featured Arwen Lawrence de Castellanos singing and playing guitar; she also played assorted traditional Latin American instruments, including the zapateado, a wooden box she danced on for percussion.

*** De Castellanos, accompanied by Govea on the trumpet, accordion, violin and guitarron — a traditional Latin American bass-type string instrument — and Jorge Liceaga playing guitar and the traditional string instruments guitarra de son and tres.

The trio had a huge and varied sound, playing songs from several different folkloric forms, such as Cancion Ranchera, or “song of the countryside,” which has its roots in the Mexican countryside, “Cancion Mexicana,” influenced by European and Cuban music and several other distinct Latin American styles.

The vocal blend between Lawrence de Castellanos and the two other musicians was outstanding, with the voices waxing and waning together skillfully.

Jasmine Flower Impression wrapped up the evening’s festivities with a varied set of traditional Chinese music, some of it arranged in modern style, all played on traditional Chinese instruments.

The first song, named after the ensemble, was an old folk song arranged by the composer, a member of the group.

Their next song was composed by Yuanlin Chen for the movie, “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon — a duet, a delicate dialogue between harp and hammered dulcimer, with occasional punctuation from traditional bowed instruments.

A gushing, or table harp, and a hammer dulcimer were played in every song, but two band members switched fluently between traditional reeds, strings and mouth-harp.

The sound made by this four-person group was stupendous. All four instruments sounded exotic, and the performance was splendid.

Presiding over the evening were the president and vice president of the World Music Club, Marlon Reynolds and Chi Fong Chan, who charmed the audience with silly jokes and prepared sketches.

e-mail:eskow@theguardsman.com


FASHION TRENDS ARRIVE TO USHER IN HOLIDAYS

BY MAYRA MARTINEZ

EDITOR

Michelle Byrnes, wears two big trends, a vintage dress and boots.

ELI MILCHMAN / GUARDSMAN

Winter’s cold won’t keep fashionistas from sporting the latest trends.  Fortunately, City College Fashion Department students are here to guide the rest of us towards those standout looks of the season.

Every semester, fashion students transform the Ocean campus cafeteria into a runway. Students style and produce shows that feature the trends and clothes of the moment. For Fall and Winter 2006, the fashion forward are bundling up chicly.

This semester’s first show featured models strutting down the runway with long blond wigs and red lips to rock music.

“There was a very vintage feel, but with an edge and a lot of leather and black, and a lot of very ‘80s styles,” said Stephanie Kazarian, one of the show’s producers.

The ubiquitous trends of stovepipe jeans and leggings were used as staples throughout the show as well as another major season must — the vintage coat.

“We also tried to incorporate fall wear like plaid and vests,” said Michelle English, who managed head the clothes and models.

The show had a look for every mood or whim including an emerald green brocade vintage coat, black miniskirt with matching leggings, skinny jeans with peeptoe stilettos and even a Louis Vuitton embossed bomber jacket.

The second show, “Ready to Wear,” highlighted what might be the two biggest trends of the season - layering and high boots.

Models sporting the winter makeup look of dark, smoky eyes and red lips wore the ultimate in avant-garde pairings, like corsets over black turtlenecks.

Not surprising for fall and winter, black again played a major role, but was dressed up with current touches. Traditional black evening dresses were modernized with yellow, hot pink and turquoise hose.

As always, accessories added doses of sex appeal and glamour. Leopard print peeptoe shoes, big black sunglasses, doorknocker earrings and knotted pearls brought the looks together.

“I think that this semester we’ve had the best shows ever,” said Fashion Department Chair Diane Green. “Sometimes you get a group that really clicks and both shows have been very professional.”

Students read Women’s Wear Daily, the daily newspaper considered to be the bible of the fashion world, and chose clothes based on current fashion trends. The clothes were borrowed from second-hand stores Buffalo Exchange, the Goodwill and Next to New. It is up to students to make sure they present the ever changing looks every season ushers in.

Fashion students also get a chance to style their own show and are given the opportunity to break into the fashion world.

This year 50 past and present students participated in Macy’s Passport, the annual fashion show held in San Francisco, and were paid to dress models and even help the show’s stylists choose the clothes from the Macy’s floor. Students had a chance to meet some famous designers and several students were chosen to be stylist interns.

At the end of the Spring 2007 class, Fashion Show Production, students will also produce a fashion show held at the Ruby Skye nightclub in San Francisco, where once again students will flex their well-earned know-how and enlighten us with fashion.

The final show of this semester, “Day to Night,” will be held Dec. 7 at Noon.

e-mail:a_e@theguardsman.com


REVIEWS

"MARIE ANTOINETTE"

As in the soundtracks for her other two movies, “The Virgin Suicides” and “Lost in Translation,” Sophia Coppola has created a dreamscape of songs for her new movie, “Marie Antoinette” that captures the type of sadness and joy that surrounded the life of Marie Antoinette. The two-disc soundtrack opens with “Hong Kong Garden” by Siouxsie and the Banshees — which might seem to be out of place until the realization comes that Coppola intends to tell Marie’s story with a modern edge, and then it works rather well. Other artists include New Order, The Cure, The Radio Dept. and Kevin Shields remixing Bow Wow Wow songs. -- Desmond Miller

e-mail:dmiller@theguardsman.com

"BORAT"

Comedian-provocateur Sacha Baron Cohen has delivered a hit with "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan."The brilliant Cohen stars as Khazakh television reporter Borat Sagdiyev, a character from Cohen’s "Da Ali G Show." Borat and his producer attempt to make a documentary about America, but plans go awry when he falls in love with Pamela Anderson after watching "Baywatch." Borat's ignorance, naiveté and depravity captures the audience and pulls them along on a quest for his future wife and hilarious, unscripted encounters ensue with unassuming Americans, upon whom he releases his scatological, incidental and often racist humor in this definite cult classic. -- Alex Mullaney

e-mail:features@theguardsman.com

"MACBOOK"

Natural evolution does not jump, it creeps — a pattern Apple products seem to follow. The new mid model MacBook’s $1299 price includes minor — but noteworthy — upgrades like a snazzy DVD burner, enough memory to multi-task effortlessly and a heart transplant: the new 64-bit processor beats faster than the old 32-bit chip. Everything a budding film or design student needs, slathered in Apple’s fun, cool-white design ethos. Still not fun: the Intel chip’s bad temper when encountering some older Mac applications, which can quit unexpectedly. But a 10 percent student discount sweetens the deal. -- Eli Milchman

e-mail:chiefcopy@theguardsman.com

"BROTHERS AND SISTERS"

Fans of Ally McBeal who loved Calista Flockhart will find ABC's new series "Brothers and Sisters," on Sundays at 10 p.m., right for them. Kitty (Flockhart), one of five Walker family siblings, returns to California and her mother (Sally Field) after her father dies. Life is suddenly turned upside down — even for the mistress her father left behind. The siblings fight to keep the jeopardized family business together while trying not to kill each other in the process. This lovely family drama deals with everyday life — spiked with extra doses of love, hate and glamour. Not one episode should be missed. -- Ann Chatrine-Nilsson

e-mail:acnilsson@theguardsman.com

"DOG WALKER"

“Dog Walker,” a collection of short stories by Arthur Bradford, offers the reader unexpected juxtapositions that elicit reactions varying from delight to fascinated revulsion. The stories are like a series of walking tours through the realm of the not quite unbelievable. Bradford’s writing seems simple at first, until it sneaks up and whacks the reader on the head. A host of side-show-like characters amble through his consciousness, evoking strong imagery and emotions. Three-legged dogs and other misfits and mutants are a repetitive theme. Bradford’s writing is hilarious and insightful. We can only hope this O. Henry award-winning author comes out with more — the sooner the better. -- Elizabeth Skow

e-mail:eskow@theguardsman.com

 

 

 

 


ENTERTAINMENT